“Truth” in Fiction – Pillars and Cantilevers

In a number of posts (Book Review: “The Retreat” by Mark Edwards, Book Review: “Follow You Home” by Mark Edwards, Conventions in Disaster Movies, “Greenland” – A Very Good Disaster Movie, “Flight 90: Disaster on the Potomac” and Remembering Air Florida Flight 90, and “The Day After Tomorrow” – Climate Change Meets Disaster Movie) I…

Lecture – “Japanese Disaster Narratives: Conservatism and Revisionism”

On Saturday 24 April 2021 I gave an online lecture for The Japan Society on the topic of ‘Japanese Disaster Narratives: Conservatism and Revisionism’. Japan has a long history of disaster movies. This lecture explained some of the key similarities and differences between English-language (primarily Hollywood) disaster narratives and Japanese ones. It was based on…

“St. Helens” – Explosive Disaster Movie

Although I have now written about all of the movies that I included in my article “Disaster Narratives by Design: Is Japan Different?“, there are still new disaster movies coming out – such as Greenland. I am also still finding older disaster movies that I didn’t manage to get before I completed my research on the…

Conventions in Disaster Movies

Although I have done a page about my article “Disaster Narratives by Design: Is Japan Different?” and I have done many posts (linked from that page) about disaster movies analysed for that article, as well as some additional disaster movies, in which I refer to the Conventions in Disaster Movies that I developed in that article,…

“Greenland” – A Very Good Disaster Movie

Although I have now written about all of the movies that I included in my article “Disaster Narratives by Design: Is Japan Different?“, there are still new movies coming out (even during COVID-19) and amongst these there are disaster movies. Having missed out on its cinema release Greenland (Ric Roman Waugh, 2020) was recently made available…

“Hiroshima” by Hideo Sekigawa – The Ultimate Japanese Disaster Movie

In the next, and last, of my posts about movies which I studied for my article “Disaster Narratives by Design: Is Japan Different?“, I am writing about Hiroshima (ひろしま) (Hideo Sekigawa, 1953). This is the oldest movie amongst all those that I studied, but it could also be the most influential – at least amongst the Japanese language…