The British Media and its Representation of the Japanese

Earlier this month I was involved with the fifth event in the Cardiff-Japanese Lecture Series, this time with Professor Perry Hinton (University of Warwick). This was an engaging webinar and had things that will be useful for my update to Japan: The Basics and my work on Visual Packaging Culture. There were even some bits…

Interview for Swedish magazine about the JL123 isho and “Brända Brev”

I was recently interviewed by Monika Israelsson for the Swedish magazine Aftonbladet Söndag about Dan T. Sehlberg’s book Brända Brev (The Burnt Letter Society) and the JL123 isho and their continued significance. The article is available online – albeit behind a paywall – see https://www.aftonbladet.se/nyheter/a/e8bG1R/breven-fran-flygkrascherna For more information about my research about JL123, see this…

Time to find out what happened to JL123

Although it is nearly 35 years since the JL123 (also known as JAL123) crash, there are still many questions – at least in the Japanese language materials – that remain about what really happened on 12 August 1985. I have already written about some of the issues in my posts about my JL123 research and…

Post 123

This is blog post number 123. For many I suspect that there is no particular significance of this number. 123. Or 1, 2, 3. But for me, I will always associate it with JL123, Japan’s and the aviation world’s Titanic, which has been one of my research areas since 2007. I have already done a…

COVID-19 and Tokyo 20/20 Vision

One of the problems of setting a book in the future is that you never know what is going to happen. With the on-going issues surrounding COVID-19 and that this is likely to remain in the public memory for some time, I thought it now looked odd if the blurb for “Tokyo 20/20 Vision” had…

Reporting of the World’s Biggest Single Plane Crash

On 12 August 1985, Japan Air Lines (JAL) flight JL123 crashed in mountains north-west of Tōkyō. When search and rescue teams reached the site, some 15 hours later, all but four of the 524 on board the Boeing 747 jumbo jet were dead. A media frenzy followed the crash, and a media helicopter had even…

Mad in Japan: Only Joking?

I am not sure whether to be shocked by the article ‘Mad in Japan’ by AA Gill (Sunday Times Magazine, 9 September 2001) or not. There are many things to consider when contemplating this. In writing this article, I hope to show how people such as myself who lecture in Japanese Studies in the UK…