Remembering the Flight JL123 Crash (1): Osutaka-no-One

Although I have written a few posts about the JL123 crash (for example, a summary of the crash, the isho (last messages), about the significance of the isho; also follow this link for a list of posts related to my research on JL123), and have written in articles and books about the memorialisation of the…

The BOAC Flight 911 Memorial

In the next of my series of posts about memorialisation sites I have visited (see also The Tōya-maru sinking and The JL350 memorial), I’m writing about my visit to the BOAC Flight 911 Memorial (英国海外航空機空中分解事故). I visited the site on 19 September 2017. A (currently very brief) summary of what happened to the flight itself…

The JL350 Memorial

After writing a post about the Tōya-maru sinking, I’ve decided to write posts about a number of other memorialisation sites that I have visited during the course of my research. Most of these I plan to do on the anniversary of the event itself, but I may do a few additional ones in the coming…

The significance of the isho (last messages) on JL123

I’ve recently moved my website. Whilst many things have changed, one thing has remained the same. Consistently one of the most popular pages (on many days, the most popular) is the one that contains my translations of the isho (last messages) written on JL123 (JAL 123). I have written in my book Dealing with Disaster…

The JL123 Isho

Update: I am currently conducting a survey about people’s interest in and impressions of the isho. Please could you help with my research by going to the following page when you have finished reading the post below.  https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/ZVPLJB3.  One of the most well known aspects of JL123 are the isho (‘last notes’, ‘last memo’, ‘will’, or ‘final…

My Research about the Flight JL123 Crash

I am conducting research about the Japan Air Lines flight JL123 (also known as JAL123) crash on 12 August 1985 in Ueno-mura. The research not only covers the crash itself (you can find a summary here), but also the aftermath of the disaster and the way in which it impacted the lives of so many…

Reporting of the World’s Biggest Single Plane Crash

On 12 August 1985, Japan Air Lines (JAL) flight JL123 crashed in mountains north-west of Tōkyō. When search and rescue teams reached the site, some 15 hours later, all but four of the 524 on board the Boeing 747 jumbo jet were dead. A media frenzy followed the crash, and a media helicopter had even…

Visualisation of Death in Japan: The Case of the Flight JL123 Crash

We are surrounded by death. But most of the time death is out of sight. For many it is a source of fear. Even though most, at least in technologically and medically advanced nations, will die relatively peacefully, the questions over death and what happens after death cause uneasiness. The possibility of dying in a…

A Summary of the JL123 Crash

On 12 August 1985, Japan Airlines flight JL123 (registration JA8119) took off from Haneda bound for Itami in Osaka. There was a mixture of passengers- many returning to their ancestral home for the Obon religious festival, businessmen, and families returning from Tokyo Disneyland. The passenger list also included the singer Kyu Sakamoto, the Hanshin Tigers…